Best Android smartwatches 2015

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These are the best Android smartwatches of 2015. / © ANDROIDPIT

Best smartwatch overall: Moto 360 (2015)

The original Moto 360 was a much-hyped Android Wear smartwatch that didn’t quite live up to the high expectations placed on it. When the Moto 360 (2015) arrived this year it improved upon a number of its predecessor’s weaknesses, and benefitted from a more robust version of Android Wear.

There’s still some questions about whether the current lineup of Android Wear devices are worth the investment, but if you are going to buy one, the Moto 360 (2015) is your best bet. It’s the most well-rounded Android smartwatch with the fewest caveats; combining good performance, practicality and lots of customization options in a neat package.

Screen: 1.37-inch, circular, LCD

1.56-inch, circular, LCD

Resolution: 360 x 325 pixels, 263 ppi

360 x 330 pixels, 233 ppi

Size: 42 x 42 x 11.4 mm
46 x 46 x 11.4 mm
Processor: Snapdragon 400, 1.2 GHz
Internal storage / RAM: 4 GB / 512 MB RAM IP: IP67 dust and water resistant
Price: Approx. US$299 / £229 Battery: 300 mAh

400 mAh

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The Moto 360 (2015) is our current favorite Android Wear smartwatch. / © ANDROIDPIT

Best value smartwatch: Asus ZenWatch 2

If you want a good Android Wear experience on a budget, the sub-US$150 ZenWatch 2 is the way to go. Asus didn’t change much between its first ZenWatch and this version, preferring instead to focus on customization options (I wonder where it got that idea from… *cough* Apple *cough*), but it has added quick-charging and a Wi-Fi chip to enable the ZenWatch 2 to take advantage of the latest Android Wear features.

It delivers much the same experience as the Moto 360 (2015) at half the price, and we have to recommend the ZenWatch 2 as the best entry point to the Android Wear world.

Screen: 1.45-inch, square(ish), AMOLED

1.63-inch, square(ish), AMOLED

Resolution: 280 x 280 pixels, 273 ppi

320 x 320 pixels, 278 ppi

Size: 45.2 x 37.2 x 10.5 mm

49.6 x 40.7 x 9.5 mm

Processor: Snapdragon 400, 1.2 GHz
Internal storage / RAM: 4 GB / 512 MB RAM IP: IP67 dust and water resistant
Price: Approx. US$149 / £110 Battery: 400 mAh
 

 

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The very reasonably priced Asus ZenWatch 2 shouldn’t be overlooked. / © ANDROIDPIT

Best smartwatch design: Huawei Watch

Huawei has succeeded where many manufacturers have gone wrong: it made a watch that looks good first, and performs well second. That’s not to say the Huawei Watch’s performance is substandard, but with relatively weak battery life, no ambient light sensor and a couple of interface problems, Huawei’s wearable is a little behind the likes of the Moto 360 (2015).

That being said, if you want the best-looking watch on Android, this is it.

Screen: 1.4-inch, circular, AMOLED Resolution: 400 x 400 pixels, 286 ppi
Size: 42 mm diameter x 11.3 mm depth Processor: Snapdragon 400, 1.2 GHz
Internal storage / RAM: 4 GB / 512 MB RAM Weight / IP: 60.5 g / IP67
Price: Approx. 349 USD / £289 Battery: 300 mAh

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The Huawei Watch wins our award for most stylish Android Wear device. / © ANDROIDPIT

Best sports smartwatch: Samsung Gear S2

The Samsung Gear S2 gets a lot of things right. It looks great, it has excellent build quality and intuitive software. But it’s this software that stops it being our first recommendation for best smartwatch. Not only does Samsung’s Tizen-based operating system mean this isn’t a true Android Wear device, but Tizen’s apps are more limited than the Android Wear bunch.

Still, as a sports watch, it’s fantastic. With a smaller body than the Moto 360, and integration with Samsung’s own S-Health app, the Gear S2 makes keeping track of your fitness easy and fun.

Screen: 1.2-inch, circular AMOLED Resolution: 360 x 360 pixels, 302 ppi
Size: 42.3 x 49.8 x 11.4 mm Processor: Exynos 3250
Internal storage / RAM: 4 GB / 512 MB RAM Weight / IP: 47g / IP68
Price: Approx. 249 USD / 179 GBP Battery: 300 mAh
 

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If it’s health and fitness you’re interested in, go with the Samsung Gear S2. / © ANDROIDPIT

Best battery life: Pebble Time Steel

The Pebble Time Steel isn’t going to blow anybody away in terms of specs: it relies on an extremely lightweight operating system and apps. It’s also quite expensive for what it offers. But the advantage that it provides above the rest of the competition is up to 10 days of battery life.

Lasting more than five times as long as the next best Android smartwatch is no small feat, just be prepared to sacrifice true Android Wear performance for it.

Screen: 1.25-inch, square Resolution: 144 x 168 pixels, 182 ppi
Size: 40.5mm x 37.5mm x 10.5mm Processor: Cortex M4, 1 core, 100 MHz
Internal storage / RAM: 16 MB / 64 KB Weight / IP: 62.3 g / water and dust resistant
Price: Approx. US$299 USD / £229 Battery: Up to 10 days
 

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Pebble’s Time Steel range has the best smartwatch battery life. / © Pebble

 

Android Wear smartwatch buying guide

If you’ve decided to take the plunge and invest in a smartwatch, you’ve got a few decisions in front of you, the first of which is whether you want an Android Wear device or something else?

There are other smartwatch options available running on Samsung’s Tizen platform as well as interesting devices by Pebble and Omate. Assuming you’re focused on Android Wear though, we’ll continue.

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With so many Android Wear choices on offer, how do you choose? / © Google

What to consider when buying a smartwatch

There are a few things to think about: size and weight, style, display type (some displays are easier to read outdoors than others), battery size and so on. Consider what you want from your watch and how you plan to use it. All of them offer a degree of water-resistance and all are reasonably light.

If you plan to never take your smartwatch off except to charge it, then a large battery is critical. If you’re outdoors a lot then you might want to opt for a smartwatch with an LCD display. OLED displays are better for battery life but they are not always so visible in the sunshine.

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Picking the right style and display type for your lifestyle are important. / © ANDROIDPIT

Internally, most Android Wear watches are about the same, so there’s no real technical advantage of one over the other. Battery size and life, screen resolution and type are the main considerations. If you have a very slim wrist you might want to avoid the particularly large designs, so size is a consideration too. Arguably the biggest factor will be style – you want the watch you wear to look good, after all.

Do you own any Android wearables? Which would you say is the best Android smartwatch? Tell us what you think in the comments.

Posted by Kris Carlon from https://www.androidpit.com/best-android-wear-smartwatches

Android Wear Introduction–Ranjan.D

Android wear is an operating system and an open platform software specially designed for smart watches and other wearable devices. Some were in March 2014, Google announced or introduced the world with  “Android Wear”, a new version of android operating system for wearables.

If you ask about the devices which make use or run Android wear, here are the popular ones – Motorola 360, Samsung Gear, LG’s G and Sony watches.

Before we discuss more on let’s take a step back and understand the wearable technology.

Wearable technology and is something which is evolving and advancing in recent years. It’s a booming technology and lots of things happening in the industry in bringing in various wearable devices to market. Google Glass, is something you can recall or remember is a head mounted wearable device.

Generally, the Android wear smart watches are paired with the smart phone. Ones paired, you should be able to do a lot of stuffs on your smart watch like

Controlling the music that’s being played on your smart phone, making a phone call or receiving one etc. Voice commands and notifications are the key thing in Android Wear. When it comes to voice, all you have to say is “OK Google” and proceed with your request or command so that the smart watch takes your command and performs necessary action.

The Android wear provides the user with the stacked set of cards through which the user can easily navigate and use the application that they are interested in. There’s a fundamental shift of change in the way how the apps run on smart watches. There is no more launching of apps but instead there’s a stream of cards, which provides all the necessary information at the right time for the user based on their location, time etc.  However, the user can still ask and get the apps that they wish anytime by just commanding Google Now by saying “OK Google” followed by the request.

Posted by Ranjan.D, 15 Oct 2015